Forecastle Forecast

Right on the border between Kentucky and Indiana, in a city which the majority of the nation can’t pronounce, there is a summer music fest classified as one of the country’s biggest. Not only has Forecastle become a mecca in the Midwest for music and dance, but it’s also a hot spot in the tristate for bourbon and beer. If you’re like me, the four words music, dance, bourbon, and beer are enough to convince me to hop on any train–no questions asked. However, I realize my priorities are not always in line with the majority, so I will delve a little deeper into how this year’s Forecastle is looking to shape up.

During the three days in Louisville, there is hardly a single time slot not being soaked up by some glowing talent. The problem with music fests is that you’re never soaking in too less. Like being in museum for too long, you can only absorb so much. It’s going to be a hard choice with the plethora of indie heroes as well as the stage giants that will rock the house. I know only two of Sam Smith’s songs, but those two are enough to attract me to his headline act. The man has a voice that lifts you up similar to fine chocolate swishing around in your mouth.

I plan to cry during both War on Drugs and Modest Mouse, however, for very different reasons.  Speedy Ortiz, Lower Dens, BRONCHO are some of the bands lower on the list that get my mind abuzz with anticipation, especially BRONCHO with its 80’s new-wavey attitude, and relatively lesser known status.

Everything between the big headliners and the little guys strikes me as blah, but with all this other great music, there is really no time to pay attention to them anyways.

There is some hip-hop but it is spread thin over the festival: Fat Tony, People Under the Stars, and Lizzo. It seems like enough to quench my thirst.  Diarrhea Planet and Twin Peaks are two Bloomington favorites that I know I won’t be missing.

Since living in Southern Indiana and Ohio I have recently discovered country music that doesn’t activate my gag reflex. If Country is your thing, this looks like it is going showcase a lot of country music not often heard: stuff not suffocating the airwaves. It wouldn’t be Kentucky without some mandolin, slide guitar, and banjos.  I’m excited for it all.